You Snooze, You Lose…

“Growing up in Namibia, I spent many of my holidays on my grandparents farm, which is in an arid area of the country. There was no electricity and every drop of water had to be pumped from a borehole. This didn’t worry my grandfather in the least.

Regardless of the season, he was up every morning before sunrise when the old cuckoo clock struck four, and was then in the kitchen making coffee. After this he headed out to attend the work of the day.

He didn’t press a “snooze” button. In fact, I doubt he ever set an alarm clock. His motto was:

“today, not tomorrow”.

He knew that when it was time to plough, that’s what had to be done, because the rains don’t have a snooze button. The same went for the cows. When they came into the kraal in the early morning, it was milking time. No hitting the snooze button.

The snooze button is an invention which encourages the poor habit of delaying unavoidable action.

Pressing the snooze button buys one a few extra minutes sleep, but doesn’t make a difference in the long run.

Instead of hitting the ground running, we fall prey to this folly of delayed action, which often results in things taking longer. Every time we choose “I-can-do-that-later”, we waste time picking up the thread and re-focusing.

In terms of safety, there are a number of examples. Two of these are OPPORTUNITY and RISK. Opportunity normally has a short time frame and if you press snooze, in most cases, you will lose out. The expression, “there will always be another opportunity”, is the language of losers.

The same goes for risk. Once it has been identified, it must be dealt with, because a risky situation cannot be put on hold. Actually, if swift action is not taken, an even bigger risk might be created by breeding complacency.”

Jurgen Tietz, diretor: eKhuluma and Disruptive Safety.
Source: SHEQ Management, Issue 1 2018.
Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Total Risk Reduction

There is no such thing as an unimportant thing or being. 

If you really want to reduce risk and improve on anything, you must consider everything in the process line or management structure. A key word is “TOTALITY”– end to end review.

A high tech iPad is of no use if you dispose of the simple charger. The most sophisticated motor vehicle is redundant without air to put in the tyres. An outstanding CEO is not outstanding without the rest of the company staff. Simple examples but you get the point!

Totality is what makes an item, process or operation subject to minimal negative risk. Outstanding management are not leaders but rather motivators. Give your staff the resources to manage and they will focus on risk.

The key risk for any CEO is simply giving staff the tools to do the job.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Quality in Schools

Quiet children can be outstanding leaders

Schools have different ways of choosing their leaders. Some schools choose leaders on the basis of those who excelled at leadership camps. Then there are schools that use a voting system where staff members and children choose by secret ballot.

Sadly, there are those schools – and it applies also to many businesses and governments – that have a voting bias in favour of the extroverts. The loudest and most eloquent children with ‘larger-than-life’ personalities seem to get preference over their quieter classmates. Yet those very quiet ones could be just as suitable and sometimes even better to take on leadership roles.

Too often leaders are unwisely chosen on their sound quality rather than their sound qualities.

 

There have been exceptional leaders who’ve given so much to the world in their quiet, unassuming ways. In the 20th century we’ve had introverts such as Madame Curie, Albert Einstein, Mahatma Gandhi and Rosa Parks of American civil-rights fame. Think of the many positive contributions that introverts of today such as Bill Gates, the Dalai Lama and Angela Merkel give our world.

Extroverts need to guard against a common negative characteristic. Their egos and forceful personalities can relentlessly (and recklessly?!) drive their personal agendas. Think of the present-day leadership found in both the United States and North Korea. Too often, extroverts aren’t good listeners. They hear but they don’t listen to the voices of quiet reasoning from introverts.

Fascinating research from Adam Grant at the University of Pennsylvania has identified a common strength of introverts. Quiet leaders usually give others greater freedom to run with their own ideas. They’re less concerned with their own egos. Quiet leaders give great attention to their thoughts before moving in to action. A core question that they often humbly ask is:

What is the best that we can do for others?

However, challenges face the quiet child when wanting to take on a leadership role. A leader is often expected to be a confident public speaker; the quiet leader prefers the one-on-one interaction with others rather than the big-group gatherings. The preferred stance of staying silent when all around them people are blabbing endlessly, is incorrectly interpreted as a weakness.

Yet the quiet child can be nurtured to gain confidence to speak in public; can be given the skills to interact comfortably in a crowd. As others get to know and understand such a child, there can be growing acceptance and respect for the innate quiet leadership. If you have a quiet child in the family, gently discourage ‘putdown’ comments such as, “I’m too quiet to be a leader. Nobody listens to my ideas,” or “Nobody notices me because I’m not a superstar in such-and-such a sports team.”

Yes, there was a time in so many schools that the extroverts and dominant personalities were viewed as the best to take up leadership positions. Fortunately, such flawed thinking is diminishing. There’s a growing realisation that quiet children can also be outstanding leaders.

Sue Cain is an internationally acclaimed writer on the issue of the introverted quiet person. In one of her books she writes a manifesto for the introverted child.

Four statements included in the manifesto are:

  1. A quiet temperament is a hidden superpower.
  2. Most great ideas spring from solitude.
  3. You don’t need to be a cheerleader to lead. Just ask Mahatma Gandhi.
  4. Speaking of Gandhi, he said: “In a gentle way, you can shake the world.”

Affirm and nurture the quiet child’s self-worth. Encourage the child to strive to take on leadership roles at school. The quality school welcomes the various leadership talents amongst the children. Quiet children deserve and need to be part of such leadership.

  • By Richard Hayward

References
Cain, S 2016. Growing up as introvert in a world that can’t stop talking. London: Penguin.
http:/ www.npr.org/2012/01/30/145930229/ quiet-please-unleashing the-power-of-introverts

Tagged with: , , , , ,

To Guide Your Company’s Future, Look to Its Past

Each company has its own DNA: a unique strategy and culture that sets it apart from competitors.

To guide an organization’s growth, you need to understand its nature. Start by looking at its past. Dig around in the company archives. Talk to early employees to find out what the organization used to be like and what shaped its beginning. Read the corporate history, if you’ve got one. Look at the original vision and values of the founders. How did they see the world? What problem were they out to solve? How did they believe the business was creating value?

Map what you learn to the company’s current business. Where is there alignment? Where isn’t there? The goal of this exercise isn’t just to increase your understanding of the company; it’s to think about how the company can create value in new ways while staying true to its origins.

Adapted from “How to Discover Your Company’s DNA,” by Mark Bonchek. harvardbusiness.org.

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tip of the Month- Be Water Wise!

Be educated about the importance of using less water.

  • Creating a workplace culture that focuses and takes pride in efficiency can be a very beneficial component of a water conservation plan. Increased awareness will ensure more staff members are monitoring water use.

Things that can be done:

    • Give recognition to those who initiate water-efficiency procedures and processes.
    • Make resource conservation part of performance reviews, especially for line managers.
Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Electric Arc Flash PPE

According to the NFPA 70E, Arc Flash is a “dangerous condition associated with the release of energy caused by an electric arc.” It is measured in terms of arc flash incident energy E (AFIE), which is used to determine the level of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

An arc flash is the light and heat produced from an electric arc supplied with sufficient electrical energy to cause substantial damage, harm, fire, or injury. This can occur near high power electrical equipment such as transformers, service entrance switch gear or generators.

The first step to protection conduct an Arc Flash Hazard Analysis which defines the procedures and limits the damage of electrical arcs on personnel and, by measuring the released energy, defines the risk and determines the relevant level of the PPE required.

 HRC* 0 –  0 cal/cm2 ; 0 J/cm2: Non-melting, flammable materials (i.e untreated cotton, rayon, wool, silk or blends of these materials) with a minimum fabric weight of 150g/m2
 HRC* 1 – 4 cal/cm2 ; 16,74 J/cm2: Arc Rated Flame Retardant shirt, Flame Retardant trousers or Flame Retardant coverall
 HRC* 2 – 8 cal/cm2 ; 33,47 J/cm2: Arc Rated Flame Retardant shirt, Flame Retardant trousers or Flame Retardant coverall
HRC* 3 – 25 cal/cm2 ; 104,6 J/cm2: Arc Rated Flame Retardant shirt and FR trousers or FR coverall, and arc flash suit selected so that the system arc rating complies with the required minimum
HRC* 4 – 40 cal/cm2 ; 167,36 J/cm2: Arc Rated Flame Retardant shirt and FR trousers or FR coverall, and arc flash suit selected so that the system arc rating complies with the required mini

*HRC:  Harzard/Risk Category

Selecting the correct level of Arc Protection Equipment (APE) is made easy from this table however there are a few questions to ask your APE supplier:

  • Is the garment compliant with SANS 724:2010, NFPA 70E:2009 and SANS 984/IEEE Std 1584?
  • Can they send you the relevant certifications?
  • Does the garment meet your required HRC level?
  • Has the garment been tested? (not the fabric – very important)
  • If so, can they send you the test reports that include photos?

It’s important to note that where more than 40cal/cm2 APE is required it is not recommended unless all other means of reducing the risk of exposure has been investigated.

The Arc PPE you use really is your last line of defence, and following the above steps ensures that you are doing the best you possibly can to minimise injuries as a result of an arc flash incident.


Information supplied by: Dromex Personal Protective Equipment.

Tip of the Month- Saving water!

With the low dam levels in the Western Cape, the issue of saving water is on everyone’s minds. But how exactly can we save water?

Here are 5 tips to get you going:

  1. Half flush the toilet (after pushing the handle down, pull it up immediately).
  2. Catch the water that is being draining from your washing machine when doing a cycle (Make sure your bucket is big enough because 25L fills up n 10seconds! You may want to use a big bin).
  3. Shorten your showers.
  4. Keep a bucket in the shower to catch the water. This can then be used to water plants and flush the toilet.
  5. Use rain barrels to catch the rain water.
Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

ISO45001 on our doorstep

ISO45001 one of the world’s much anticipated standards for occupational health and safety (OHS), has been approved as a Draft International Standard.

Every 15 seconds, a worker dies from a work-related accident or disease, and 153 people experience a work-related injury. These represent an enormous burden for organizations and society as a whole, costing over 2.3 million deaths a year, not to mention the more than 300 million non-fatal accidents*.

Now, with ISO 45001 at the Draft International Standard (DIS) stage, the world is one step closer to a robust and effective set of processes for improving work safety in global supply chains. Designed to help organizations of all sizes and industries, the future standard is expected to reduce workplace injuries and illnesses around the world.

More than 70 countries are directly involved in the creation of this important document, being developed by project committee ISO/PC 283, Occupational health and safety management systems.

“Implementing a strong occupational health and safety management system helps organizations reduce accidents and ill health, avoid costly prosecutions, perhaps even reduce insurance costs, as well as create a culture of positivity in the organization when its people see that their needs are being taken into account,” explains David Smith, Chair of the committee. “Wide adoption of ISO 45001 should reduce the horror stories in the media of poor OHS management leading to loss of life, injury and large-scale disasters, as seen in the factory buildings around the world.”

ISO 45001 is based on the common elements found in all of ISO’s management system standards, assuring a high level of compatibility with the new versions of ISO 9001, Quality management systems, and ISO 14001, Environmental management systems. It uses a simple Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) model, which provides a framework for organizations to plan what they need to put in place in order to minimize the risk of harm. The measures should address concerns that can lead to long-term health issues and absence from work, as well as those that give rise to accidents.

Now that ISO 45001 has advanced to the DIS stage, national member bodies of ISO have been invited to vote and comment on the text of the standard during the three-month balloting period. If the outcome is positive, the modified document may then be circulated to ISO members as a Final Draft International Standard (FDIS). In the event of an affirmative vote, ISO 45001 is expected to be published as an International Standard by late 2016 / early 2017.

Source: www.iso.com
Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tip of the Month- Know Safety, No Injury

As we go into the new year it is important to keep in mind that when it comes to health and safety everyone plays a part. As a team we need to all know and understand safety and the safety requirements. This is imperative in order to limit injuries and save unnecessary costs.

KNOW SAFETY, NO INJURY!

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tip of the Month- Quality Customer Service

Customer Service

The way your customers feel towards you is important. The more you show you care about them, the more they’ll likely want to continue working with you. With that in mind, providing good customer service to your clients should naturally be a major priority in your day-to-day schedule. This can be done easily with ISO implemented in you business!

Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
Top